Model Appropriate Behavior for Your Children

When it comes to children, you are their role model. Parents are their first teachers. It is important to let them know how to deal with various situations as they age. Appropriate responses lead to positive outcomes. Never is this more important than dealing with defiant children. Model appropriate behavior. It will make things easier on you and on your children.

What Makes Defiant Children Different

Defiant children may suffer from a condition called ODD, Oppositional Defiant Disorder. This is more complex than just being stubborn. These children are disagreeable in the extreme and the behaviors occur almost daily. Parents often feel responsible or guilty for their children’s behavior anyway, so this just makes the situation that much more intense. The children may break the rules, talk disrespectfully, and repeat annoying behaviors on a regular basis. Traditional types of discipline only fuel the children’s anger and irritability. Parents often find themselves on a perpetual search for new ways of handling the situation.

Practice what you preach.

To help the children and family, professionals, who specialize in behavioral disorders, can offer effective methods to help parents problem-solve, decrease negativity, manage anger, and increase social skills. There are also family sessions to discuss how the issues affect each household member.

In addition, parents can make things better by modeling the behaviors they want their children to emulate. Defiant children have a problem dealing with their emotions. Looking at their parents examples can assist them in making the best choices.

Practice Handling Adult Conflicts

During the day, you have many opportunities to practice conflict resolution with the adults around you. If your children hear you yelling at the customer service person when you have an issue, your children won’t think twice about yelling at you and others. Instead of becoming loud or aggressive, learn to communicate with others calmly and quietly. Even if your children aren’t anywhere around, the chances are high that someone’s children are within hearing distance.

Wait Patiently and Quietly

Have you waited in line for a long time because of a slow checkout person? Don’t mutter about them under your breath and then smile at them when you get to the head of the line. Resist giving people dirty looks as well. Waiting is a part of life.

Practice waiting patiently and quietly. You feel better in the end and you set the standard for your children when you model the behavior you expect to see in them. The earlier your children learn and master this skill, the better off they will be. Let’s face it. To be perfectly honest, it also means that you will be embarrassed less often by your children blurting out something they obviously heard you say.

Agree to Disagree

Kids watch you interact with others. When you have a disagreement, don’t yell, stoop to name-calling, or bring up the past. Deal with the situation at hand. Focus on the current issue only and redirect the focus back to the present as needed. Ideally, when people disagree, a compromise is made and each person gives a little.

There are times when a compromise just isn’t possible under the circumstances. In this case, it’s best to set a boundary, agreeing to disagree. This allows you to accept that the other person has a different point of view without agreeing with it.

Accept the Consequences

If you miss a payment, you get a late fee. You are responsible for paying it on time. Don’t make excuses or lay the blame elsewhere. Accept that you made a mistake and do things differently next time so that you don’t make the same mistake again. When you accept the consequences of your actions, your children will begin to understand that they aren’t the only ones who have to take responsibility for what they do, or don’t do, and say.

Use every opportunity to demonstrate positive behavior to your defiant children. It reminds them that they always have choices. The trick is to show them how to weigh the consequences of each and make the best choice.

 

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How to Eat to Stop Emotional Overeating

When you think of stopping emotional overeating, does it seem like an impossible goal? You’re not alone – many people who suffer from this problem feel imprisoned and helpless. It can seem like you are unable to break free from the overwhelming emotions and habits. But there’s good news – it’s a treatable problem.

Being honest with yourself is an important first step. Emotional overeaters tend to judge themselves pretty harshly, but don’t – you’re not an isolated case or some kind of freak. It’s a sign of strength to seek help! It means you’ve identified the problem.

If you’re struggling with this problem, there are some things you can do to get things under control while you’re seeking professional help. Here are some tips.

Your Grocery List

When an emotional moment hits and you head for the refrigerator or pantry, what kind of foods do you usually go for? Often, emotional overeaters head for high-calorie comfort foods like ice cream, chips, or candy bars. But you can’t eat those things if they are not in your house! Here are some examples of foods to put on your grocery list in place of the ones you may be tempted to buy. (Another tip – buy only the foods on your list. Compulsive buying of food is tempting.)

* Brown rice (instead of white rice)
* Millet (instead of or in addition to rice)
* Fresh fruits and vegetables (rather than canned)
* Low-fat, low-calorie yogurt (rather than ice cream)
* Popcorn kernels for air popping (rather than chips and fatty snacks)
* Lean protein like fish, turkey, and chicken (instead of deli meats and processed meats like hotdogs and bologna)
* Natural, healthy cooking oils like olive and safflower oil (instead of shortening, lard, or unhealthy oils)

Don’t Crash Diet

It’s good to be proactive in solving problems, and emotional eating is no exception. If you try to crash diet, you may find yourself eating more after the crash diet is over. So, rather than stopping eating everything you love, try some of these tips.

* Allow yourself to have a dish of frozen yogurt each week as a treat. This approach tends to be easier than just cutting out all frozen treats. You could use this approach with other “naughty” foods, too – it may be easier to resist if you know you are going to have that food on Saturday (or whatever day of the week you choose to have a small treat).

* Boost your nutrition with a good quality vitamin and mineral supplement.

* Increase your consumption of nutrient-dense foods.

Eat Regular Meals

Experts recommend regular mealtimes as a way to combat emotional overeating. If it’s not “time” for food, then you may be better able to hold off on eating until it is time. Also, eating regular meals helps you to be deliberate about your intake of nutritious foods. And finally, having regular meal times tends to make for a more relaxed eating experience, which is the direct opposite of anxiety-driven overeating.

 

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Write This story 6

A trampline park manager gets propositioned by an employee, but when he turns her down she decides to get revenge. What does she do, and how does he eventually get the best of her?

 

Write this story using the writing prompt above leave it in the comment section below or on your blog to link back here from your blog.There is no word count just write the story however you like.

One-Liner Wednesday – Lemons

“If life hands you lemons… make lemonade. Then… try to find someone to whom life has handed vodka…”
Les Edgerton

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If you would like to participate, feel free to use the “One-Liner Wednesday” title in your post, and if you do,
you can ping back here to help your blog get more exposure. To execute a ping back, just copy the URL in the address bar on this post, and paste it somewhere in the body of your post. Your link will show up in the comments below. Please ensure that the One-Liner Wednesday you’re pinging back to is this week’s! Otherwise, no one will likely see it but me.

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As with Stream of Consciousness Saturday (SoCS), if you…

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Macro Moments Challenge Announcement of A Change

Musin' With Susan

 Participation in the Macro Moments Challenge has dropped lately and everyone needs a change from time to time, so I am changing the deadlines and postings to twice monthly instead of weekly.  Posts and announcement of winners will be on the 1st and 3rd Wednesday of each month and deadlines for entering will be on the 1st and 3rd Tuesday at 8:00 a.m. Pacific Time.  This will give you, the participants, more time to decide on your entries and take wonderful photos to share!  

Entries submitted during this past week will be carried over to next week and new entries will be accepted until next Tuesday. You can either link to this post or last week’s https://musinwithsusan.com/2017/03/01/macro-moments-challenge-week-33/

I often struggle with achieving the sharpness that I desire when shooting macro.  This week I went back and reviewed an article that I think  is excellent https://robinwong.blogspot.com/2012/09/olympus-mzuiko-60mm-f28-macro-review.html and followed Robin Wong’s suggestions.  Here…

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