Book Review :- Elle Burton and the reflective Portals By Peggy M McAloon and Anneka Rogers.

Third Culture Wife.

I am always open to reading books of different genre but not always of the children’s book variety. Reading Elle’s story pronounced (Ellie) I quickly forgot that it was for children. The character is one we can all identify with through the various struggles and challenges she faces and later overcomes. It’s a book about Love, loss, hope, healing, kindness and a lot of things we sometimes forget to teach or remind our children to be. Though this tale is woven through fantasy, it can’t help be anything but real. Elle Burton reminds us to be brave,honest and even believe in the magic of people, friends and family. Be sure to join Elle in her adventures in this first installment.

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How to Create Evergreen Blog Content

Suzie Speaks

How to create evergreen blog content

There are two types of content that I usually post on my blog:

Daily Experiences – things I see and do, journal-type notes, general thoughts etc. These posts are generally just for fun – I write them for enjoyment and they keep within the original purpose that the blog was intended for: therapy. I don’t pay much attention to SEO, keywords or images as I know that these sorts of posts will be seen over a period of about a month and then will be considered to be out of date. Essentially, non-evergreen content that has an expiration date.

Evergreen Content – posts that will be generally relevant over long periods of time and aren’t necessarily specific to my own life. Within these I am much more focused on keywords and SEO techniques, I spend a much longer period of time crafting beautiful and pinnable images and I make sure…

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Recipe: Chicken & Pineapple Cauliflower Fried Rice

Cauliflower “rice” is a great substitute for making lower carb dishes! This healthier version of fried rice has plenty of veggies and can easily be made into a vegetarian dish, too.

Serves: 4

Total Time: 30 minutes

INGREDIENTS:

  • 1 medium head cauliflower, cut into florets OR Trader Joe’s fresh riced cauliflower (16 oz bag)
  • 2 chicken breasts, cut into chunks
  • 2 large eggs, whisked
  • 1 teaspoon sesame oil
  • 2 teaspoons olive oil
  • Non-stick cooking spray
  • 1/2 sweet onion, diced
  • 1 Tablespoon + 1 tsp minced garlic, divided
  • 1 bell pepper, diced
  • 1 cup baby broccoli
  • 6 Tablespoons low sodium soy sauce, divided
  • 1 cup diced pineapple
  • Salt & pepper, to taste

DIRECTIONS:

  1. Slice chicken breast into chunks, marinate in 3 Tbsp soy sauce and 1 tsp minced garlic for 20-30 minutes, in the meantime chop your vegetables
  2. Add the cauliflower florets to a food processor and pulse just until the…

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Crossroads haiku: Winter crow

Jane Dougherty Writes

Since it’s National Haiku Day, according to twitter, here’s a haiku for Carpe Diem a crossroads haiku, fusion of two haiku to make a third, original one. The two haiku we are given in the prompt are:

the crow has flown away:
swaying in the evening sun,
a leafless tree.

over the wintry
forest, winds howl in rage
with no leaves to blow.

© Soseki Natsume

This is my fusion of the two.

Crow wings bear away

the winter sun

wind gnaws bare boughs.

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Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 80, GATHER & SOFT, #SynonymsOnly

🍂Word Craft: Prose & Poetry🍂

Welcome to Tanka Tuesday

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

Hi! I’m glad to see you here. Are you ready to write some poetry?

HERE’S THE CATCH: You can’t use the prompt words! SYNONYMS ONLY!

I hope you will support the other poets with visits to blogs and by leaving comments. Sharing each other’s work on social media is always nice too.


Opportunities for Poets

Dime Show Review publishes fiction, flash fiction, ten-word stories, poetry, and essays, both online and in print. They are looking for literature that suspends doubt, writing that appears of its own accord and tells secrets we never suspected but always knew.

Dime Show Review is published three times a year in print, and online on a rolling basis. They accept submissions from February 1 through November 1 each year, and they respond to most submissions within two to twelve weeks. Authors who don’t receive a response within three months are welcome…

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