The Reality of Judging a Book by Its Cover

  by Katie McCoach I think it’s time we talk about book covers. We all know the saying “Don’t judge a book by its cover,” but let’s be honest, this usually applies to people, and not actually …

Source: The Reality of Judging a Book by Its Cover

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Keeping a Writer’s Notebook – Do You? You should! – Part 3

Don Massenzio's Blog

This is the third post in my series on keeping a writers notebook. I can’t emphasize enough how important this tool is for cataloging and organizing ideas. I take most of my ideas for this tool from the book, The Writer’s Notebook by Ralph Fletcher. This book helps you organize your notebook and use the information you record for various purposes.

If you want to read Part 1 or Part 2 of this series, just click on the links.


interesting wordsKeep Lists of Interesting Words

Did you ever come across a word while playing Words with Friends or while thumbing through a magazine article or the vocabulary quiz in Reader’s Digest and think that it was an interesting word that you’d like to use some time?

I started keeping lists of words and their definitions some time ago and try to weave them into my writing.

Here are some examples:

  • Instead…

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Keeping a Writer’s Notebook – Do You? You should! – Part 2

Don Massenzio's Blog

This is the second post in my series on keeping a writers notebook. I can’t emphasize enough how important this tool is for cataloging and organizing ideas. I take most of my ideas for this tool from the book, The Writer’s Notebook by Ralph Fletcher. This book helps you organize your notebook and use the information you record for various purposes.

If you want to read Part 1 of this series, you can click HERE.


incubator

Your Notebook is Like an Incubator

Think of your writer’s notebook as a place where the seeds of ideas are stored and nurtured until they can hatch into full-fledged stories. Once you’ve recorded an idea, your mind will return to it and may collect other observations and partial ideas that will help nourish the original thought into a complete story or book idea.

These seeds can be partial sentences or even a single word…

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Keeping a Writer’s Notebook – Do You? You should! – Part 1

Don Massenzio's Blog

This blog post drills down into something I use quite a bit to generate ideas for stories and books. I used this idea early on, well before I wrote my first short story or book, because I knew I would be writing someday. My efforts were not highly organized until I found a book to help me maximize this tool. That book is The Writer’s Notebook by Ralph Fletcher. This book helps you organize your notebook and use the information you record for various purposes.

Here are some of the important things I learned from this book that I currently use:

Capturing Unforgettable Stories

The idea behind this tips is to observe those things that move you. You might be at a wedding or watching something in nature or on the news. Those events that, after they occur, continue to stay in your mind hours after you experience them are…

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The Importance Of Plot Twists [Mystery Month]

Rachel Poli

When it comes to writing any genre, plot twists are always a good, fun thing to have up your sleeve. When it comes to writing mysteries, plot twists can sometimes be essential.

You want the reader to figure it out, but you also want to blow their mind, right?

The importance of plot twists in mystery writing

A plot twist is exactly what it sounds like. The events in your story lead your readers to believe one thing and then suddenly, usually towards the end, something unexpected happens that twists the whole plot around.

It’s a surprise, it makes your readers keep turning the pages, sitting at the edge of their seat.

So, how do you write an awesome plot twist?

1. Reveal something big

When writing a mystery, revealing something big can be pretty easy to come by. Reveal an extra bad guy or even an unknown victim. Find a brand new piece of evidence. Or, let…

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